@JimmySlaughter

Bought a fancy peeler/corer/spiral cutter.

Guys, I’ve had a serious craving for french crullers, for a long time. I need to know of a place in DFW that makes these, right now.
(photo by: seriouseats)

Guys, I’ve had a serious craving for french crullers, for a long time. I need to know of a place in DFW that makes these, right now.

(photo by: seriouseats)

Will you do the ALS ice bucket challenge?

molly23:

fishingboatproceeds:

Probably not, partly because I am still recovering from meningitis and so the thought of doing anything out of bed is a bit overwhelming, but also for other reasons. I worry this makes me a totally humorless party pooper, but… 

ALS is a terrible disease and there isn’t enough research money devoted to it. Raising money for ALS research is important, and while some people complain that the whole ice bucket challenge thing is mere slacktivism, the ALS Association has raised millions of dollars it otherwise wouldn’t have raised. And that’s great. This has been an extremely successful campaign, and I think it’s wonderful.

That said, I have mixed feelings about tying fundraising (or awareness campaigns) to stuff like the ice bucket challenge. Here’s the question: Why are we raising money for ALS instead of raising money for pediatric cancer research or food aid or for domestic violence shelters?

I feel like the answer to that question ought to be, “We’re raising money for ALS because ALS research is underfunded and can benefit from these resources,” not, “We’re raising money for ALS because the ice bucket challenge is a thing on the Internet right now.” If our philanthropy is dictated only by what happens to bubble up to the surface of the Internet’s consciousness, we’re not making careful choices about how to distribute our limited resources. 

And when it comes to charity, everyone has limited resources. Whether you give $5 or $5,000,000 a year to charities, there will always be good causes you cannot fund. So you need a very good answer to the question, “Why did you donate to X and Y?” because there will always be a Z—a very worthy Z—to which you did not donate.

This is not meant in any way to diss those who’ve participated in the ice bucket challenge: it’s an important cause and it has been tremendously successful. And I certainly don’t want to strip the joy of giving and sharing from charity. Sarah and I are just focused on trying to make sure our giving is driven by need and the opportunity to create lasting change.

John Green is great. I like John Green.

edwardspoonhands:

notational:

Is there a better way of showing a text message in a film? How about the internet? Even though we’re well into the digital age, film is still ineffective at depicting the world we live in. Maybe the solution lies not in content, but in form.

For educational purposes only. You can follow me at twitter.com/tonyszhou

Here are three short films that take place on your desktop
Internet Story (2010): youtu.be/g-SL4ejpP94
Noah (2013): vimeo.com/81257262
Transformers: the Premake (2014): youtu.be/dD3K1eWXI54

Music:
Trent Reznor & Atticus Ross - In Motion (from The Social Network)
David Arnold & Michael Price - On the Move (from Sherlock)
Daft Punk - End of Line (from Tron: Legacy)
Al Hirt - Green Hornet Theme (from Kill Bill Vol. 1)

NEAT NEAT NEAT NEAT!! Watch this. I wrote my thesis on the relationship between the internet and physical space and my views on it have evolved dramatically since then, but investigating how it is portrayed in film is such a cool way of analyzing it. Still much work to be done…I can’t wait to watch the first movie that takes place entirely on the internet.

Waiting on the Ravens’ TV talent. (at AT&T Stadium)

Waiting on the Ravens’ TV talent. (at AT&T Stadium)

On the right: a modern HD TV camera. On the left: a Sony DXC-3000, which was manufactured in the mid-80’s. (at AT&T Stadium)

On the right: a modern HD TV camera. On the left: a Sony DXC-3000, which was manufactured in the mid-80’s. (at AT&T Stadium)

artdicct:

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

 Drawings by John Pusateri

New Zealand based artist John Pusateri creates near photo-realistic drawings of beautifully colored owls using pencils, charcoal, and pastels. Pusateri currently teaches in the Department of Architecture at Unitec New Zealand and currently has a number of works available through Seed Gallery.

Today is my 32nd birthday. It was a somewhat non-disappointing day, but now this news about Robin Williams has me really bummed.